jaeggi.nl,Wine,,Rice,$24,Traditionally,Eden,Japan,,/Lamanism1320275.html,Cooking,Umam,in,Grocery Gourmet Food , Pantry Staples,Mirin,,Made jaeggi.nl,Wine,,Rice,$24,Traditionally,Eden,Japan,,/Lamanism1320275.html,Cooking,Umam,in,Grocery Gourmet Food , Pantry Staples,Mirin,,Made $24 Eden Mirin, Rice Cooking Wine, Traditionally Made in Japan, Umam Grocery Gourmet Food Pantry Staples Eden Mirin Rice Cooking Wine Traditionally Umam 1 year warranty in Japan Made $24 Eden Mirin, Rice Cooking Wine, Traditionally Made in Japan, Umam Grocery Gourmet Food Pantry Staples Eden Mirin Rice Cooking Wine Traditionally Umam 1 year warranty in Japan Made

Eden Mirin Rice Cooking Wine Traditionally Umam 1 year warranty in Max 74% OFF Japan Made

Eden Mirin, Rice Cooking Wine, Traditionally Made in Japan, Umam

$24

Eden Mirin, Rice Cooking Wine, Traditionally Made in Japan, Umam

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Product description

Ajino-haha' Mirin is traditionally made in Japan of U.S.A. Lundberg organic short grain brown rice. Essential in dashi noodle broth, teriyaki sauce, marinades, and sushi rice. Shoyu and mirin are the right and left hands of Japanese cooking. Mirin with some shoyu or mirin, shoyu, and brown rice vinegar is a supreme marinade. Eden Mirin is made by first washing and steaming California grown Lundberg Family Farm organic brown rice for several hours. After cooling it is mixed with a bit of rice koji Aspergillus oryzae called seed koji. The rice mixture is placed in a temperature and moisture controlled koji room for three days where it is stirred daily to ensure proper growth of the koji enzymes. The rice koji is then placed in large vats and mixed with more steamed rice and water. This rice mixture is called 'moromi,' or rice wine mash, that is allowed to ferment for two months. At this time sea salt is added, as well as more steamed rice, koji and water. It is allowed to ferment for another three months. After fermentation is complete, the mixture is pressed through cotton sacks and filtered to remove rice residue. It is heated to 85°C. for 3 to 4 seconds. Mirin's alcohol content, about ten percent, quickly evaporates when cooked with food or may be removed by heating it to the boiling point, and allowed to cool before adding to uncooked foods. Mirin's virtue as a seasoning was heightened by being used in Japan's most elegant form of cooking, 'Kaiseki,' or tea ceremony cooking. Over the years mirin's popularity as a seasoning increased among the general public as it became more affordable, but the quality of most mirin sharply declined.

Eden Mirin, Rice Cooking Wine, Traditionally Made in Japan, Umam

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